Alfredo James Pacino

Alfredo James Pacino net worth is $185 Million. Also know about Alfredo James Pacino bio, salary, height, age weight, relationship and more …

Alfredo James Pacino Wiki Biography

Alfredo James Pacino  was born on 25 April 1940, in East Harlem, New York City USA, of Italian-American descent. He is an actor, film director, producer, and screenwriter, but Al Pacino is undoubtedly best remembered for two characters portrayed by him that stand out above all –  Michael Corleone in Francis Coppola‘s “The Godfather”, and Tony Montana in Brian De Palma‘s “Scarface”.

So just how rich is Al Pacino? Sources estimate that Al’s impressive net worth is $185 million, accumulated during his career in the film industry spanning more than 45 years. Pacino is considered to be one of the greatest and most memorable actors of our time.

During his early years, Al Pacino dreamt of becoming a baseball player and, not being a good student, skipped most of his classes. As a result, he dropped-out from the prestigious High School for Performing Arts in the Bronx and left his home at the age of 17. At the time, his only income consisted of the low-paid jobs he took in order to survive, marking one stage of highs and lows that recurred during his lifetime. In 1966, Pacino attended the Actor‘s Studio, and later performed a role of a street youth in an off-Broadway drama entitled “The Indian Wants The Bronx” that earned him an Obie Award for the Best Actor in the 1967-1968 theatrical season.

Pacino‘s first on-screen acting appearance was in the 1969 movie entitled “Me, Natalie” and two years later he starred as a heroin addict in Jerry Schatzberg‘s “The Panic in the Needle Park”. This role caught the attention of movie director Francis Ford Coppola, who offered Pacino a leading role in his movie “The Godfather”. For the role of Michael Corleone in the first movie Al earned $35,000, while his appearance several years later in “The “Godfather: Part III” earned him $5 million.

This wasn’t the peak of Pacino‘s acting career, however, as shortly after the first movie, in 1983 Al was offered the role of a Cuban drug lord in De Palma‘s high grossing “Scarface”, a movie that earned $4.5 million during its opening week and further established Pacino as an extraordinary, charismatic and publicly admired actor.

Not surprisingly, most of Pacino‘s income and wealth comes from his acting career. Pacino is said to star in an average of one movie per year, which accounts for a total of 50 movie performances during his career, with scheduled appearances in the upcoming films “The Humbling” by Barry Levinson and “The Irishman” by Martin Scorsese in 2015.

Pacino has also been nominated for and won awards for the majority of his remarkable roles: he is a four-time Golden Globe winner with 15 nominations, a two-time Primetime Emmy Awards and Tony Awards winner, as well as a one-time Academy Awards and BAFTA Film Awards winner.

In his personal life, Al Pacino has never married, but has a daughter with acting coach Jan Tarrant. He also has twins, a son and a daughter with actress Beverly D’Angelo, with whom he had a relationship from 1996 until 2003. Pacino has also had relationships with Diane Keaton, his co-star in “The Godfather” trilogy, Tuesday Weld, Jill Clayburgh, Marthe Keller, Kathleen Quinlan and Lyndall Hobbs. Despite leading a luxurious lifestyle and having many homes in the prestigious Palisades area of New York, Al Pacino is an active charity worker, supporting the causes of AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Save The Children, Make Poverty History, as well as Exploring the Arts and Amnesty International among many others.

IMDB Wikipedia $185 Million 5 ft 6 in (1.7 m) Academy Award Academy Award for Best Actor Actor Actors AIDS Healthcare Foundation Al Pacino Al Pacino Net Worth Alfredo James “Al” Pacino Alfredo James Pacino Angels in America (2003) Anton James D’Angelo April 25 Beyond Deceit Brian De Palma Cinema of the United States Culture of New York City Entertainment Film Film director Film producer Francis Ford Coppola Italian American Jack and Jill (2011) Jan Tarrant Jerry Schatzberg Jewel of India Jill Clayburgh John Cazale Julie Marie Tarrant Kathleen Quinlan Lyndall Hobbs Lyndall Hobbs1940 Manhattan Marthe Keller Michael Corleone New York New York City Olivia Rose D’Angelo on’t Know Jack (2010) Primetime Emmy Award Robert De Niro Scarface Scent of a Woman (1993) Serpico (1974) Sonny Sonny Corleone The Godfather The Godfather (1972) The Godfather Part II The Godfather Part III The Godfather Saga (since 1977) The Godfather: Part II (1974) The Godfather: Part III (1990) The Manlet Theatre Director Tony Award Tony Montana Tuesday Weld United States United States of America You D

Alfredo James Pacino Quick Info

Full NameAl Pacino
Net Worth$185 Million
Date Of BirthApril 25, 1940
DiedAugust 23, 2014, Tizi Ouzou, Algeria
Place Of BirthManhattan, New York City, United States
Height5 ft 6 in (1.7 m)
ProfessionActor, Film director, Film Producer, Theatre Director
EducationHigh School of Performing Arts, Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School, HB Studio
NationalityAmerican
ChildrenJulie Marie Tarrant, Olivia Rose D’Angelo, Anton James D’Angelo
ParentsSal Pacino, Rose Gerard Pacino, Marie Bodjongo, M. André Bodjongo
SiblingsRoberta Pacino, Josette Pacino, Paula Pacino, Desiree Pacino, Alex Bodjongo
NicknamesAlfredo James Pacino , Sonny , Alfredo James “Al” Pacino , The Manlet
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/AlPacinoinfo/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/alpacinoreal?lang=en
Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/official.alpacino_/
IMDBwww.imdb.com/name/nm0000199
Allmusicwww.allmusic.com/artist/al-pacino-mn0000612611
AwardsAcademy Award, Tony Awards, Primetime Emmy Awards, British Academy Film Award, Golden Globe Awards, Lifetime Achievement Award (American Film Institute), National Board of Review Awards, Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, National Medal of Arts
NominationsAcademy Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture, MTV Movie Award for Best Villain, BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, Satellite Award for Best Acto…
MoviesThe Godfather (1972), The Godfather Part II (1974), Serpico (1974), The Godfather Part III (1990), Scent of a Woman (1993), Jack and Jill (2011), You Don’t Know Jack (2010)
TV ShowsThe Godfather Saga (since 1977), Angels in America (2003)

Alfredo James Pacino Trademarks

  1. Diminutive frame, off-set by his formidable bearing
  2. Jet black hair
  3. Surly but essentially moral characters with deep capacity for violence
  4. Frequently plays men of power and/or authority
  5. Volcanic tirade, smoke-burnished voice

Alfredo James Pacino Quotes

  • [on becoming famous] The reaction wasn’t positive. I was catapulted out of a cannon. People are more accepting of fame today because of all the media outlets. Young people even aspire to it. I became more aware of myself, constantly reminded that I had this name because strangers kept calling me by it. Being an outsider is part of being an artist. You try to conform. But some of us just can’t. I didn’t know what was expected of me. I still don’t.
  • [on Johnny Depp] — Johnny is one of the greatest actors of his generation. He has incredible instincts. He’s able to put himself into the head of his character and vary his level according to the needs of each scene. That’s a very rare gift.
  • [on Diane Keaton getting him back into movies after a four-year hiatus in the 1980s] I’d probably be a short-order cook right now if it wasn’t for Diane. I’d become kind of detached from everything and I was enjoying a life out of the mix. She’s the one who found Sea of Love (1989) and told me I should do it. She said, ‘You’re not on the A-list anymore, buddy. Are you going to go back to living in a rooming house? You’ve been rich too long. You’re an adult now.'”
  • [on one’s career] I think that the idea of resurgence is wonderful. But basically I think it’s just luck. Also, if you start to say, ‘How about if I made a movie with this person who is really a good director?’ or ‘How about if I did a movie about something that I feel I’ve got something to say about?’ These things happen and I feel you’re lucky when it happens.
  • [on being off-screen from 1985 to 1989] I poured my own money into my own film, The Local Stigmatic (1990). Which I never released. I did some plays. All of a sudden the years passed and suddenly I owed some back taxes and the mortgage was due and I was broke. But you know what really hit me? I was walking through Central Park and this guy comes up to me – didn’t know him at all – and he says, ‘Hey, what happened to you? We don’t see you, man.’ I said, ‘Well, I… uh… uh…’ and he said, ‘C’mon Al, I want to see you up there.’ And I recognized that I was lucky to have what I’ve been given. You gotta use it.
  • [on directing] I have worked with many great film directors and seen that there is a level of film-making that I can never get to so I don’t even bother. I just enjoy engaging in film as an amateur. I don’t have the pressure of having to deliver. I am off the hook.
  • I asked God for a bike, but I know God doesn’t work that way. So I stole a bike and asked for forgiveness.
  • [on The Godfather trilogy] A long, awful, tiring story.
  • [on turning down the part of Han Solo in Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (1977)] That role was mine for the taking but I couldn’t understand the script.
  • I was smoking at nine and smoking a pipe by 12… well, I was dramatic. The cop on the beat used to buy us booze when I was 13 and 14. He was a great guy. He would say, ‘Have a little of this’, and he would keep a watch on us. I don’t know that it would be politically correct but he is not working anymore and is long retired.
  • [on rejecting the role of John McClane in Die Hard (1988)] I gave that boy [Bruce Willis] a career.
  • The first thing that comes to mind about Sea of Love (1989)? Ellen Barkin’s body.
  • [on Scarface (1983)] We couldn’t show our faces after it opened. I was at a party after a screening at Sardi’s. I walked in and the faces looked like those in a wax museum. People were sitting so still. Liza Minnelli was there. She hadn’t seen the movie. She came up to me and said: ‘What did you do to these people?’ And yet it survived.
  • Something happened in the 1980s that is hard to define. It had something to do with the movies that Steven Spielberg and George Lucas – both very close friends of Francis Ford Coppola – started to make. I met them when they were kids. I saw them as real film people. I got no feeling of theatre from them. They are geniuses. But they set the standard for a new kind of movie. You also can’t discount the impact of television. It’s a complex story. Those socially concerned movies like Serpico (1973) or Dog Day Afternoon (1975) or Taxi Driver (1976) were no longer as doable. Those films became independent film. They were no longer launched as brassy marquee features. That’s exactly right. You look at The Panic in Needle Park (1971): a film about two drug addicts in the city. That was made by Fox. They could never get that made today.
  • [on working with Marlon Brando in The Godfather (1972)] I loved him. He was such a sensitive person. He saw the difficulties I was having and I think he saw a little of himself when he was young. I was in awe. I remember once he came up behind me and gave me a little massage. ‘You okay?’ he’d say.
  • [on being offered the part of Michael Corleone in The Godfather (1972)] Naturally my first thought was: ‘I can’t play that. It’s a really hard part. Can’t I play Sonny? That’s a good part.’ Then all this screen testing began. It was the Scarlett O’Hara of its day. Francis put that cast together and they okayed everybody except for me and Marlon Brando. Finally, they okayed Marlon. ‘But this kid? No way!’
  • [on his acting teacher Lee Strasberg] Someone said to him: ‘Oh, I know you.’ He replied: ‘You know my name. You don’t know me’.
  • [on the tough neighborhood he grew up in] They used to call it Fort Apache – the 41st Precinct. But that was the start of the heroin thing. Around 1948 that’s when the drugs came into New York. That’s when the trouble started. Of all my dearest, closest friends from that time, none of them survived.
  • [on being in Dublin, Ireland] I always feel so at home here, it’s great. In fact, I just want to do a movie here so then I could really stay for a while, get around and see it, and be a part of it.
  • I’m the same now as I’ve always been – sort of a recluse. People resent me for remaining myself when they think I should be acting like a superstar. I never wanted to be an actor and I don’t particularly enjoy it. I have to act. There just isn’t anything else for me.
  • [on preparing to play the character of Tony Montana in Scarface (1983)] I worked with an expert in knife combat, with a physical education guy who helped me get the kind of body I wanted for the part. I used the boxer Roberto Durán a little bit. There was an aspect of Durán , a certain lion in him that I responded to in this character. And I was very inspired by Meryl Streep’s work in Sophie’s Choice (1982). I thought that her way of involving herself in playing someone who is from another country and another world was particularly fine and committed and… courageous.
  • [on the casting of Michael Corleone in The Godfather (1972)] Francis [Ford Coppola] knew I could do the part, and so did I. But he kept asking me to test again and again. I didn’t want to go. I don’t go where I’m not wanted. Once I got the role, I was waking up at four or five in the morning and going into the kitchen to brood over [it].
  • With young actors I learn from them, just as hopefully I always will. If I were to advise them in some way, I would say this is a craft that you just have to keep doing. Do it whenever you can and you shouldn’t spend too much time dealing with the fact that there’s a world out there with a lot of competition. You have to educate yourself. You have to read. You have to see things that are inspiring to you.
  • [on people considering him a legend] I’m very flattered to hear that, that compliment. I don’t think of myself as anything but an actor struggling to find the next role and when I do get the role to try and see if I can find any way into it.
  • (1979, on his pre-fame job as a building superintendent) I was about 26. My friend told me about this job with a rent-free apartment and $14 a week. So I went down and got a boiler’s permit and came back and I was a super. It was my first real place that was not a rooming house or sharing with a girl-I had lived with a girl before that. Now I had my own little home. I had no money, hardly anything to eat, but I had a roof over my head. I was a super for 11 months. I drank, actually, but I hung in there and came out of it. It was a very fruitful time and, at the same time, it was the lowest time in my life. I used to hang an 8 x 10 glossy of me on the door.
  • (1979, on his beginning as an actor at the High School of Performing Arts) I was never very happy with performing; it didn’t turn me on much. If I made a catch at third base, I’d do a double somersault and sprawl out on the ground. I was acting-overacting. They taught Stanislavsky at Performing Arts. That whole thing about the Method and serious acting, having to feel it, I thought it was crazy. What was going on? Where was the fun? So I was kind of bored with it.
  • [1979, Playboy Magazine] I wanted to be a baseball player, naturally, but I wasn’t good enough. I didn’t know what I was going to do with my life. I just had a kind of energy, I was a fairly happy kid, although I had problems in school. In the eighth grade, the drama teacher wrote my mother a letter saying she should encourage me. I used to recite The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. And I would read the Bible in the auditorium. That was the first time I heard of Marlon Brando. I was in a play and they said, “Hey, Marlon Brando – this guy acts like Marlon Brando.” Isn’t that weird? I was about 12. I guess it was because I was supposed to get sick onstage and I really did get sick every time we did this play. Actually, the person I related to was James Dean. I grew up with the Dean thing. Rebel Without a Cause (1955) had a very powerful effect on me.
  • (1979 quote on his first time at the Oscars) I was at the Oscars once, for Serpico. That was the second time I was nominated. I was sitting in the third or fourth row with Diane Keaton. Jeff Bridges was there with his girl. No one expected me to come. I was a little high. Somebody had done something to my hair, blew it or something, and I looked like I had a bird’s nest on my head, a real mess. I sat there and tried to look indifferent because I was so nervous. Any time I’m nervous, I try to put on an indifferent or a cold look. At one point, I turned to Jeff Bridges and said, “Hey, looks like there won’t be time to get to the Best Actor awards.” He gave me a strange look. He said, “Oh, really?” I said, “It’s over, the hour is up.” He said, “It’s three hours long.” I thought it was an hour TV show, can you imagine that? And I had to pee-bad. So I popped a Valium. Actually, I was eating Valium like they were candy. Chewed on them. Finally came the Best Actor. Can you imagine the shape I was in? I couldn’t have made it to the stage. I was praying, “Please don’t let it be me. Please.” And I hear . . . “Jack Lemmon.” I was just so happy I didn’t have to get up, because I never would have made it.
  • (1979, Playboy Magazine) Bang the Drum Slowly is my all-time-favorite film. I saw that three or four times. I’d like to go see it again. The baseball motif, the quality of the relationship between Moriarty and De Niro, is beautiful. Maybe I relate to it because I wanted to be a baseball player. For some reason, people don’t talk about that movie.
  • (1979, on Marlon Brando) There’s no doubt every time I see Brando that I’m looking at a great actor. Whether he’s doing great acting or not, you’re seeing somebody who is in the tradition of a great actor. What he does with it, that’s something else, but he’s got it all. The talent, the instrument is there, that’s why he has endured. I remember when I first saw On the Waterfront. I had to see it again, right there. I couldn’t move, I couldn’t leave the theater. I had never seen the likes of it. I couldn’t believe it.
  • The most popular movie I’ve ever made is Scarface (1983), all over the world. It’s amazing to me. It’s wonderful. We sometimes forget that it was Oliver Stone who wrote it. He is a political creature, and I think that is an undercurrent in the movie. And the combination of him and Brian De Palma made for this kind of fusion or explosion. It worked.
  • I am a dancer, but I don’t think I would be on Dancing with the Stars (2005) mainly because I would be too shy.
  • I recommend watching The Dresser (1983). It’s a great movie if you want to know about actors.
  • Gary Cooper was kind of a phenomenon – his ability to take something and elevate it, give it such dignity. One of the great presences. Charles Laughton was my favorite. Jack Nicholson has that kind of persona; he’s also a fine actor. Robert Mitchum’s great. Lee Marvin, too. These guys are terrific actors.
  • After every movie, Humphrey Bogart — even at the end — was very worried he’d never get another part. If you don’t get the job, there’s no work, there’s no outlet, there’s no expression, there’s no painting. You just live and hope that another day will come with a role that will serve as a canvas for you.
  • He who persists at his folly will one day be wise.
  • An actor with too much money will usually find a way to get rid of it.
  • It surprised me, the feeling I got when I won the Oscar for Scent of a Woman (1992). It was a new feeling. I’d never felt it. I don’t see my Oscar much now. But when I first got it, there was a feeling for weeks afterward that I guess is akin to winning a gold medal in the Olympics. It’s like you’ve won a race and everybody knows you won. It’s a wonderful feeling, a complete feeling.
  • [on making The Godfather (1972)] Every time I’d run into Marlon Brando on set, my face would turn red and I’d start laughing…have you any idea what it was like to do a scene with Brando? I sat in movie houses when I was a kid watching Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and Viva Zapata! (1952). Now I’m playing a scene with him. He’s God, man!
  • [on Jack Lemmon] Jack was the most selfless actor I’ve ever worked with. He was the most considerate and the most generous. He cared a great deal about what he was doing. He was a complete actor who gave 150 percent. But the remarkable thing about Jack was that he kept growing. So his best work was his latest work.
  • [on Heat (1995)] I remember chasing Bobby De Niro around at 3 a.m. I didn’t warm up and boom, there went my hamstring. I was like, “Great, I feel like old Al.” Then I realized, “I AM old Al.” I guess I have to keep in shape as I get older. But I don’t like to work out. Whenever I get the urge to exercise, I lie down until it passes.
  • The only problem is, I don’t have the appetite to make my own pictures. I don’t want to direct. So I’m always in a kind of passive position, waiting for someone to come to me with a project… That I sort of don’t like.
  • [on Julie Christie] The most poetic of actresses.
  • My dad was in the army. World War II. He got his college education from the army. After World War II he became an insurance salesman. Really, I didn’t know my dad very well.
  • [on The Godfather: Part III (1990)] You know what the problem with that film is? The real problem? Nobody wants to see Michael have retribution and feel guilty. That’s not who he is. In the other scripts, in Michael’s mind he is avenging his family and saving them. Michael never thinks of himself as a gangster – not as a child, not while he is one and not afterward. That is not the image he has of himself. He’s not a part of the Goodfellas (1990) thing. Michael has this code; he lives by something that makes audiences respond. But once he goes away from that and starts crying over coffins, making confessions and feeling remorse, it isn’t right. I applaud [Francis Ford Coppola] for trying to get to that, but Michael is so frozen in that image. There is in him a deep feeling of having betrayed his mother by killing his brother. That was a mistake. And we are ruled by these mistakes in life as time goes on. He was wrong. Like in Scarface (1983) when Tony kills Manny – that is wrong, and he pays for it. And in his way, Michael pays for it.
  • In America most everybody who’s Italian is half Italian. Except me. I’m all Italian. I’m mostly Sicilian, and I have a little bit of Neapolitan in me. You get your full dose with me.
  • [When asked what a movie of his life would be called and who would play him] It would be called ‘The Dustin Hoffman Story’. When we were starting out, [Robert De Niro], me and Hoffman were always sort of mixed up. People mistook us for each other.
  • [When asked what romantic character he would want to be] [Pablo Picasso]. I love the idea that he used to just sit and stare at an empty canvas for as long as 12 hours straight. If you keep staring at the canvas, the hope is that something or someone will come to mind. That’s a romantic notion in itself.
  • I don’t understand the hatred and fear of gays and bisexuals and lesbians…it’s a concept I honestly cannot grasp. To me, it’s not who you love…a man, a woman, what have you…it’s the fact THAT you love. That is all that truly matters.
  • My first language was shy. It’s only by having been thrust into the limelight that I have learned to cope with my shyness.
  • The actor becomes an emotional athlete. The process is painful — my personal life suffers.
  • I’ve always believed, I always hoped . . . I don’t think I know what I’m saying when I say this, but I was hoping that we could have a museum where we had films. That there was a museum where films were, like, hung. Like paintings. And you went to the museum. I got the movie The Local Stigmatic (1990) that I made. It’s 52 minutes and everybody has seen it now because I’ve personally got them in to see it, to show it to them and I paid them for it, too. But it’s over at the Museum of Modern Art and I love saying . . . This is really pretentious of me, this is what I really like. I love to say: ‘Oh, it’s at the Museum of Modern Art. Isn’t that great?’ ‘Have you released it?’ ‘No, I never did.’ I love saying that, you know? ‘How come?’ ‘Because I didn’t feel like it.’ It’s fun to do that.
  • [on why his film Chinese Coffee (2000) has yet to be released] ‘Coffee’ is done, I got a couple of little important things to do about it, like little tiny things, and THEN I will unveil it. It’s not a movie that you put in a . . . it needs a certain environment to flourish in. It’s just the way it is. It doesn’t make it better or worse than the picture. It’s just the way it is, the nature of it.
  • [on whether or not acting is still challenging for him] The challenge? It’s always a challenge of a sort. It’s a challenge to get up and go and leave your family and go out there in all different parts of the world and do a picture and try to make it come alive . . . You’re still challenged for that. I mean, it’s the same story. It’s just not changed. It seems to be the same thing it always was. It’s this effort. If you get excited about a thing then things are generally a little easier. If you get enthusiastic and you want to do something and you feel you are into something then things start to come. But usually to find the enthusiasm and the appetite, that’s the challenge.
  • [on doing Scarecrow (1973) with Gene Hackman] Gene and I are two people not very similar. We had to play a very close relationship, but I just didn’t think we were as connected as we should have been. We seemed apart. We didn’t have altercations, we didn’t hate each other. But we didn’t communicate, didn’t think in the same terms. Gene and I were thrown together, but under ordinary circumstances we’d never cavort or be friends. It was two worlds – but I have to say that I was as much responsible as he was.
  • [on his friend and Heat (1995) co-star Robert De Niro] I remember seeing things that Bob had done in the past, and very recent times, and have been taken with the work so much that I even wrote [him] about it. Some of his great work — which is plenty — I was staggered by the subtlety of his portrayal and the warmth, which is what we often talk about with Bob among us actors who admire him so. It is the warmth and the way he approaches things.
  • [on his friend and Heat (1995) co-star Robert De Niro] We know each other’s minds. We have shared some things that are personal to us, such as our roles. I know Bobby through his roles. But, then, I don’t think we actually talked about the actual work of actors.
  • [Presenting the Lifetime of Achievement Award to director Sidney Lumet at the 2005 Academy Awards] As an old village poet put it to me in the 1960s. [If you dig it, it’s yours]. I dug Sidney Lumet back then. I dig him now because what he had to give, I took and made it mine. I’m forever grateful along with all the other actors and writers who have benefited from Sidney’s genius.
  • by Robert Osborne in “Academy Awards 1974 Oscar Annual”] I couldn’t exist just doing films. But on the other hand, there is the fame that comes with it, and the money. My problem is I still want to play Hamlet in some little theater somewhere, and time is running out.
  • But I was just lucky. People like [Francis Ford Coppola] were making films, and I got opportunities.
  • One hopes to find out about the [movie] you’re in while you’re doing it, not several years later, which is usually when I find out. I’m like, ‘Wow, that was a dud! I didn’t know, nobody would tell me!’ I’ve done things for certain reasons, but it [comes from] thinking on your feet… Sometimes actors do things not because we have a great desire [for it], but because it’s work, and I’m starting to wonder about that.
  • People always said that time, the ’70s, was about pretty boys, and then I came along!
  • I guess you find yourself repeating certain motifs. But at the heart of it all, I’m an actor, always looking for a role. And then you try to make things fresh.
  • I’m constantly striving to break through to something new. You try to maintain a neutral approach to your work, and not be too hard on yourself.
  • I hope the perception is that I’m an actor, I never intended to be a movie star.
  • That’s right! That’s right! We know the best feeling in the world is the one between the second and third martini. That was my deal. I just enjoyed who I became when I was drinking, so that was something hard to break. I became much quieter, and funny. I must say, that kind of thing came out.
  • I’ll tell you something. And this is a fact. When I was doing Scarface (1983), I remember being in love at that time. One of the few times in my life. And I was so glad it was at that time. I would come home and she would tell me about her life that day and all her problems and I remember saying to her, ‘Look, you really got me through this picture’, because I would shed everything when I came home.
  • [on whether acting and his roles reflected who he is] In the end you’re just playing a role.
  • Did you know I started out as a stand-up comic? People don’t believe me when I tell them.
  • I like what Norman Mailer said about alcohol: ‘Drink has killed a lot of my brain cells and I think I would have been a better writer without it, but it would be one less way to relax.’
  • I’m single and I don’t particularly like it. I’m certainly the kind of person who prefers … it … it … It’s good to have someone in your life that you’re going through this thing with. It’s good. That’s a thing in life that I aspire to.
  • When I try to explain anything I always end up trying to be right usually, but not truthful necessarily. Trying to give the right answer or what I think is the right answer. It’s a human instinct. You try to be as clever as you can be. You’re trying to come off like you really know what the hell’s going on, when you don’t!
  • There are times when I have a temperament. Yes, my temperament is there … but I hope I’m gentle. Yes, I think I am.
  • I can’t say I’ve been sober though. I don’t like that word. What does it mean? ‘Sober! He’s very sober’.
  • The problem with me is, I guess, the way I express myself, you have to be with me 50 years before you can get a sense of what I’m talking about.

Alfredo James Pacino Important Facts

  • $11,000,000
  • ca. $11,000,000
  • $6,000,000
  • $1,500,000
  • $5,000,000
  • $1,000,000
  • $500,000 and 10% of the gross after break-even
  • $35,000
  • Offered the role of Two-Face in Batman: The Animated Series (1992).
  • Along with Fay Bainter, Teresa Wright, Barry Fitzgerald, Jessica Lange, Sigourney Weaver, Holly Hunter, Emma Thompson, Julianne Moore, Jamie Foxx and Cate Blanchett, he is one of only eleven actors to receive Academy Award nominations in two acting categories in the same year. He was nominated for Best Actor for Scent of a Woman (1992) and Best Supporting Actor for Glengarry Glen Ross (1992) at the 65th Academy Awards in 1993, winning the former award.
  • Struggled with alcoholism during the start of his career.
  • After completing The Godfather (1972), Al was so broke he actually owed a studio $15,000 so he never saw a paycheck for his work on that film.
  • He has worked with 7 directors who have won a Best Director Oscar: Francis Ford Coppola, Sydney Pollack, William Friedkin, Warren Beatty, Oliver Stone, Steven Soderbergh, and Barry Levinson.
  • Along with Barry Fitzgerald and Sylvester Stallone, he is one of only three actors to receive Oscar nominations for both Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor for playing the same character: (1) Fitzgerald was nominated for both awards for playing Father Fitzgibbon in Going My Way (1944), (2) Pacino was nominated for Best Supporting Actor for playing Michael Corleone The Godfather (1972) and Best Actor for the same role in The Godfather: Part II (1974) and (3) Stallone was nominated for Best Actor for playing Rocky Balboa in Rocky (1976) and Best Supporting Actor for the same role in Creed (2015).
  • Although he played Morgana King and Marlon Brando’s son in The Godfather (1972), he is only ten and sixteen years their junior respectively.
  • Has great respect for many of his peers including Robert De Niro, Johnny Depp and Sean Penn.
  • As of 2014, has appeared in six films that were nominated for the Best Picture Oscar: The Godfather (1972), The Godfather: Part II (1974), Dog Day Afternoon (1975), The Godfather: Part III (1990), Scent of a Woman (1992) and The Insider (1999). Of those, The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather: Part II (1974) are winners in the category.
  • Claims to have learned more about acting from friend John Cazale than from anybody else.
  • During the early 80s Pacino tried unsuccessfully to develop a biographical film on Amedeo Modigliani.
  • Release of his book, “Al Pacino in Conversation with Lawrence Grobel”. [2006]
  • Palisades, New York: Acting [February 2012]
  • Starring in “Salome: The Reading” with Marisa Tomei on Broadway. [April 2003]
  • Performing on Broadway in “Salome” alongside Sheryl Lee, in the Circle in the Square Theatre, New York, USA. [June 1992]
  • Became a father for the 2nd and 3rd time at age 60 when his [now ex] partner Beverly D’Angelo gave birth to their twins Anton and Olivia Pacino on January 25, 2001.
  • Became a father for the 1st time at age 49 when his [now ex] partner Jan Tarrant gave birth to their daughter Julie Marie Pacino, aka Julie Pacino, on October 16, 1989.
  • One of the few Razzie Award winners to have won an acting award for playing himself. He won Worst Supporting Actor for Jack and Jill (2011).
  • Is one of 9 actors to have won the Triple Crown of Acting (an Oscar, Emmy and Tony); the others in chronological order are Thomas Mitchell, Melvyn Douglas, Paul Scofield, Jack Albertson, Jason Robards, Jeremy Irons, Geoffrey Rush and Christopher Plummer.
  • Starred as King Herod in Oscar Wilde’s “Salomé” on Broadway in 1992 opposite Sheryl Lee (directed by Robert Allan Ackerman), and in 2003 opposite Marisa Tomei (directed by Estelle Parsons). He reprised the role opposite Jessica Chastain in 2006 in Los Angeles and in the documentary-drama film Wilde Salomé (2011) that he also wrote and directed.
  • He was awarded the 2011 American National Medal of the Arts for his services to drama on February 13, 2012 at the White House in Washington D.C.
  • Before becoming a professional actor he held a number of jobs including a messenger, shoe salesman, supermarket checker, shoe shiner, furniture mover, office boy, fresh-fruit polisher, and a newsboy.
  • Spoke three of the American Film Institute’s 100 Movie Quotes: “Keep your friends close, but your enemies closer.” from The Godfather: Part II (1974) at #58, “Say ‘hello’ to my little friend!” from Scarface (1983) at #61 and “Attica! Attica!” from Dog Day Afternoon (1975) at #86.
  • He studied drama at HB Studio in Greenwich Village in New York City.
  • Lives in Palisades, New York.
  • The voice of Moe the Bartender from The Simpsons was based on Pacino in Dog Day Afternoon (1975).
  • Lifetime Member of the prestigious Actors Studio. He was accepted into the studio in 1966, studying under legendary acting coach Lee Strasberg.
  • He is a huge fan of Dick Van Dyke.
  • Got Kevin Spacey his first major role in a film. Pacino saw Spacey performing on Broadway and suggested him to the director of Glengarry Glen Ross (1992) for the role of “John Williamson”.
  • When asked by the AFI, he named The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978) and Singin’ in the Rain (1952) as his favorite films.
  • (Summer 1992) Starred on Broadway alongside Sheryl Lee in Oscar Wilde’s “Salome”, in the Circle in the Square Theatre, under the direction of Robert Allan Ackerman. The play costarred Suzanne Bertish, Arnold Vosloo and Esai Morales.
  • Former New York deputy mayor Ken Lipper was one of Pacino’s classmates in school.
  • Resides in Beverly Hills, California.
  • He has been a friend of HRH Prince Charles, The Prince of Wales, for several years, and has stayed as his guest at Highgrove House.
  • His Oscar nomination for The Godfather (1972) marked his first of 4 consecutive nominations, a feat he shares with Jennifer Jones (1943-1946), Thelma Ritter (1950-1953), Marlon Brando (1951-1954) and Elizabeth Taylor (1957-1960).
  • Has suffered from chronic insomnia.
  • Oscar-winning director John Schlesinger envisioned a cast of Pacino, Julie Christie and Laurence Olivier for Marathon Man (1976). Pacino has said that the only actress he had ever wanted to work with was Christie, who he claimed was “the most poetic of actresses.” Producer Robert Evans, who disparaged the vertically challenged Pacino as “The Midget” when Francis Ford Coppola wanted him for The Godfather (1972) and had thought of firing him during the early shooting of the now-classic film, vetoed Pacino for the lead. Instead, Evans insisted on the casting of the even shorter Dustin Hoffman! On her part, Christie — who was notoriously finicky about accepting parts, even in prestigious, sure-fire material — turned down the female lead, which was then taken by Marthe Keller (who, ironically, became Pacino’s lover after co-starring with him in Bobby Deerfield (1977)). Of his dream cast, Schlesinger only got Olivier, who was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar. Pacino has yet to co-star with Christie.
  • Over the end credits of Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story (2005) the two stars, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon compete at doing Pacino impressions.
  • At one point, David Cronenberg was in line to direct the film The Singing Detective (2003), with Pacino in the lead.
  • 1970-75: Lived with Jill Clayburgh.
  • Revealed to James Lipton on Inside the Actors Studio (1994) for the first time ever that his maternal grandfather was born in Corleone, Sicily.
  • Stated in an interview that the movie he most wanted to be in but couldn’t get the role was Slap Shot (1977). Director George Roy Hill opted not to go with Pacino because he could not ice skate.
  • 10/16/97: Imprinted his hands and signature in cement at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre.
  • Was director Bryan Singer’s first choice for the role of “Dave Kujan” in The Usual Suspects (1995). Pacino passed on the role and has since stated that that is the role he regrets passing on the most.
  • His performance as Frank Serpico in Serpico (1973) is ranked #40 on the American Film Institute’s 100 Heroes & Villains.
  • His performance as “Michael Corleone” in The Godfather: Part II (1974) is ranked #11 on the American Film Institute’s 100 Heroes & Villains.
  • His performance as Tony Montana in Scarface (1983) is ranked #74 on Premiere Magazine’s 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time.
  • 2006: His performance as Michael Corleone in The Godfather: Part II (1974) is ranked #20 on Premiere Magazine’s 100 Greatest Performances of All Time.
  • 2006: His performance as Sonny Wortzik in Dog Day Afternoon (1975) is ranked #4 on Premiere Magazine’s 100 Greatest Performances of All Time.
  • Turned down role as Michael Corleone in the Godfather videogame.
  • Turned down the role of Richard Sherman for a remake of The Seven Year Itch (1955) which was never filmed.
  • During the making of The Recruit (2003), he met and became close friends with Colin Farrell. He went on to call Farrell the most talented actor of his generation.
  • He is one of only six actors to be nominated for an Oscar for playing the same role in two films. He was nominated as for The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather: Part II (1974). The others are Paul Newman as Fast Eddie Felson in The Hustler (1961) and The Color of Money (1986), Bing Crosby as Father O’Malley in Going My Way (1944) and The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945), Peter O’Toole as Henry II in Becket (1964) and The Lion in Winter (1968), Cate Blanchett as Elizabeth I in Elizabeth (1998) and Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007) and Sylvester Stallone in Rocky (1976) and Creed (2015).
  • Had been friends with John Cazale since they were teenagers. They starred together in Dog Day Afternoon (1975), The Godfather: Part II (1974) and The Godfather (1972).
  • Alec Baldwin, who co-starred with Pacino in Glengarry Glen Ross (1992) and Looking for Richard (1996), wrote a 65-page final thesis on Pacino and method acting for his degree at NYU.
  • Early in his acting career, he considered changing his name to “Sonny Scott” to avoid being typecast by his Italian name. “Sonny” was his childhood nickname.
  • Briefly worked as a stand-up comic early in his career.
  • Worked in the mail room of Commentary magazine.
  • Has a production company called Chal Productions. The “Ch” is in tribute his friend “Charlie Laughton” (not the actor Charles Laughton) while the “Al” is for himself.
  • Attended The High School of the Performing Arts until he dropped out.
  • Grew up in the South Bronx, New York City
  • 2005: Premiere Magazine ranked him as #37 on a list of the Greatest Movie Stars of All Time in their Stars in Our Constellation feature.
  • He and Jamie Foxx are two out of the only three actors to be nominated for an Academy Award for both Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor in the same year. (Barry Fitzgerald did it first in 1945) Pacino was nominated in 1993 for Scent of a Woman (1992) and Glengarry Glen Ross (1992) / Foxx in 2005 for Ray (2004) and Collateral (2004). Both men won the Best Actor award, and they both played blind men in their roles: Pacino as Frank Slade and Foxx as Ray Charles.
  • His favorite actress is Julie Christie.
  • While Paramount brass dithered over whether to cast him as Michael Corleone in The Godfather (1972), the role that would make him a star, a frustrated Pacino signed up for the role of Mario Trantino in The Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight (1971). When Paramount finally decided to offer him the role in “The Godfather”, it had to buy him out of his contract with MGM. Ironically, the role went to Robert De Niro, whom The Godfather: Part II (1974) would make a star.
  • Turned down the lead role of Roy Neary in Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
  • His performance in the Broadway play “Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?” won him a Tony Award for Best Dramatic Supporting Actor, and a Drama Desk Award and Theatre World Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1969.
  • Won the Best Actor Obie (awarded for the best Off-Broadway performances) for “The Indian Wants The Bronx” in 1968. Was also nominated for a Best Actor Obie for “Why Is A Crooked Letter” in 1966.
  • Was a longtime member of David Wheeler’s Theatre Company of Boston, for which he performed in “Richard III” in Boston from Dec. 1972 to Jan. 1973 and at the Cort Theater in New York City from June 10 to July 15, 1979. He also appeared in their productions of Bertolt Brecht’s “Aurturo Ui” at the Charles Theater in Boston in 1975 and later in New York and London, and in David Rabe’s “The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel” at the Longacre Theater in New York in 1977, for which Pacino won a Tony Award. Wheeler also directed Pacino in Heathcote Williams’ “The Local Stigmatic” for Joseph Papp’s Public Theater in New York City in 1976. Pacino appeared in a 1989 film of “Stigmatic” (The Local Stigmatic (1990)) directed by Wheeler that was presented at the Cinémathèque in Los Angeles.
  • He has four sisters: Josette, a teacher, twins Roberta Pacino and Paula, and a younger sister named Desiree, whom Pacino’s father adopted whilst married to his fourth wife.
  • He is the stepson of actress and make-up artist Katherin Kovin-Pacino.
  • He was rejected repeatedly by studio heads while auditioning for the role of Michael in The Godfather (1972) but Francis Ford Coppola fought for him. This film was shot briskly because both the director and the leading actor were in constant fear of being fired. Ironically, it turned out to be a breakthrough for both.
  • Read for Chazz Palminteri’s part in The Usual Suspects (1995). Source: Director Bryan Singer, “Pursuing The Usual Suspects” documentary from UK DVD.
  • In 2004 he became the 18th performer to win the Triple Crown of Acting. Oscar: Best Actor, Scent of a Woman (1992); Tony: Best Supporting Actor-Play “Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?: (1969) and Best Actor-Play “The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel” (1977); and Emmy: Best Actor-Miniseries/Movie, Angels in America (2003).
  • Portrayed crime bosses in The Godfather Trilogy, Scarface (1983) and Dick Tracy (1990).
  • He was voted the 41st Greatest Movie Star of all time by Entertainment Weekly.
  • In a “Playboy” magazine interview, he claimed that he was fired from his job as a movie theater usher while walking down the staircase and admiring himself in the mirrored wall.
  • For a short while, he was the only actor to be in the #1 Best and Worst Movie on IMDb: The Godfather (1972) and Gigli (2003).
  • Was voted the Number 1 greatest movie star of all time in a Channel 4 (UK) poll.
  • He is an avid William Shakespeare fan, “Hamlet” being his favorite play.
  • Studied acting under his friend Charles Laughton.
  • He and Chris Sarandon improvised their scene on the phone in the film Dog Day Afternoon (1975).
  • Won his first Oscar twenty-one years after his first nomination.
  • Won two Tony Awards: in 1969 as Best Supporting or Featured Actor (Dramatic) for “Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?” and in 1977 as Best. Actor (Play) for “The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel.”
  • He is one of the eleven elite thespians to have been nominated for both a Supporting and Lead Acting Academy Award in the same year. The other ten are Barry Fitzgerald Fay Bainter, Teresa Wright, Jessica Lange, Sigourney Weaver, Emma Thompson, Holly Hunter, Julianne Moore, Jamie Foxx and Cate Blanchett. Pacino was the second male actor, after Fitzgerald, to have been nominated for both a Best Supporting Actor and a Best Actor Oscar in the same year; the third is Foxx, who was nominated for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor in 2005.
  • Despite the fact that he starred in “The Resistable Rise of Arturo Ui” for Off- Broadway scale pay (the minimum salary allowed by Actor’s Equity), the production had the highest ticket price in Off-Broadway history at $100 per ticket.
  • One of the few Hollywood stars who has never married.
  • Larry King considers Pacino’s appearance on his show Larry King Live (1985) in November 1996 as one of his personal all-time favorite interviews.
  • Once worked as an usher at Carnegie Hall.
  • Is an avid fan of opera.
  • Al was so much into character (playing a plain-clothes NYC cop) while filming Serpico (1973) he actually pulled over and threatened to arrest a truck driver for exhaust pollution.
  • 1994: Stopped a two-pack-a-day smoking habit to protect his voice. In the mid-1980s he had been smoking four packs of cigarettes a day. He now only occasionally smokes herbal cigarettes.
  • Francis Ford Coppola asked Pacino to play Captain Willard in his film Apocalypse Now (1979). Pacino politely turned down the offer, saying he’d “do anything” for Francis but he “wouldn’t go to war with him!”.
  • Was frequently refered to as “that midget Pacino” by producers of The Godfather (1972) who didn’t want him for the part of Michael Corleone.
  • His maternal grandparents originate from Corleone, Sicily. His paternal grandparents originate from San Fratello, Sicily.
  • Originally asked for $7 million for The Godfather: Part III (1990), a figure that so enraged director Francis Ford Coppola that he threatened to write a new script that opened with Michael Corleone’s funeral. Pacino settled for $5 million.
  • Turned down Crimson Tide (1995).
  • Turned down Pretty Woman (1990).
  • Turned down the role of Han Solo in Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (1977).
  • Turned down Apocalypse Now (1979).
  • Turned down Born on the Fourth of July (1989).
  • Turned down the role of Ted Kramer in Kramer vs. Kramer (1979).
  • Dropped out of school at the age of 17.
  • Son of Sal Pacino (insurance agent) and Rose Pacino (she died when Al was 22).
  • January 1961: Was arrested, charged with carrying a concealed weapon.
  • October 1997: Ranked #4 in Empire (UK) magazine’s “The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time” list.

Alfredo James Pacino Filmography

TitleYearStatusCharacterRole
The Irishman2018pre-productionJimmy HoffaActor
Hangman2017/IIpost-productionDetective ArcherActor
Happy ValleyTV Movie pre-productionJoe PaternoActor
The Trappre-productionActor
Dabka2017Seymour TolbinActor
Misconduct2016Charles AbramsActor
Danny Collins2015Danny CollinsActor
Manglehorn2014ManglehornActor
The Humbling2014Simon AxlerActor
Salomé2013King HerodActor
Phil Spector2013TV MoviePhil SpectorActor
Stand Up Guys2012ValActor
Jack and Jill2011/IAl PacinoActor
The Son of No One2011Detective Charles StanfordActor
You Don’t Know Jack2010TV MovieJack KevorkianActor
Righteous Kill2008RoosterActor
Ocean’s Thirteen2007Willy BankActor
88 Minutes2007Jack GrammActor
Two for the Money2005WalterActor
The Merchant of Venice2004ShylockActor
Angels in America2003TV Mini-SeriesRoy CohnActor
Gigli2003StarkmanActor
The Recruit2003Walter BurkeActor
People I Know2002Eli WurmanActor
S1m0ne2002Viktor TaranskyActor
Insomnia2002Will DormerActor
Chinese Coffee2000Harry LevineActor
Any Given Sunday1999Tony D’AmatoActor
The Insider1999Lowell BergmanActor
The Devil’s Advocate1997John MiltonActor
Donnie Brasco1997LeftyActor
City Hall1996Mayor John PappasActor
Heat1995Lt. Vincent HannaActor
Two Bits1995GrandpaActor
Carlito’s Way1993CarlitoActor
Scent of a Woman1992Lieutenant Colonel Frank SladeActor
Glengarry Glen Ross1992Ricky RomaActor
Frankie and Johnny1991JohnnyActor
The Godfather: Part III1990Don Michael CorleoneActor
Dick Tracy1990Big Boy CapriceActor
The Local Stigmatic1990GrahamActor
Sea of Love1989Det. Frank KellerActor
Revolution1985Tom DobbActor
Scarface1983Tony MontanaActor
Author! Author!1982Ivan TravalianActor
Cruising1980Steve BurnsActor
…and justice for all.1979Arthur KirklandActor
The Godfather: A Novel for Television1977TV Mini-SeriesDon Michael CorleoneActor
Bobby Deerfield1977BobbyActor
Dog Day Afternoon1975SonnyActor
The Godfather: Part II1974MichaelActor
Serpico1973SerpicoActor
Scarecrow1973LionActor
The Godfather1972Michael CorleoneActor
The Panic in Needle Park1971BobbyActor
Me, Natalie1969TonyActor
N.Y.P.D.1968TV SeriesJohn JamesActor
Danny Collins2015performer: “Hey Baby Doll”, “Don’t Look Down”Soundtrack
Phil Spector2013TV Movie performer: “Abraham, Martin and John”Soundtrack
Jack and Jill2011/Iperformer: “Dunkaccino”Soundtrack
Bobby Deerfield1977performer: “Red Sails In The Sunset”, “Boo-Hoo!”Soundtrack
Serpico1973performer: “Aria di Rinuccio” – uncreditedSoundtrack
Salomé2013Director
Wilde Salomé2011DocumentaryDirector
Chinese Coffee2000Director
Looking for Richard1996DocumentaryDirector
The Humbling2014producerProducer
Looking for Richard1996Documentary producerProducer
The Local Stigmatic1990producerProducer
Wilde Salomé2011Documentary written byWriter
Looking for Richard1996Documentary narrationWriter
Frank Serpico2017Documentary special thanksThanks
Desire2015/IShort special thanksThanks
Mantus2014special thanksThanks
Art of Conflict2012Documentary special thanksThanks
Arbitrage2012the director wishes to thankThanks
Little Spain2011Documentary very special thanksThanks
Dick Tracy Special2010TV Movie special thanksThanks
Explicit Ills2008special thanksThanks
Scarface: The World Is Yours2006Video Game special thanksThanks
Based on a True Story2004Documentary thanksThanks
Biography2001TV Series documentary very special thanks – 1 episodeThanks
HBO First Look1999TV Series documentary short special thanks – 1 episodeThanks
The Best of Hollywood1998TV Movie documentary thanksThanks
In the Name of the Father1993special thanksThanks
The Godfather Family: A Look Inside1990TV Movie documentary thanksThanks
Julian Schnabel: A Private Portrait2017DocumentaryHimselfSelf
CBS This Morning2016TV SeriesHimselfSelf
39th Annual Kennedy Center Honors2016TV MovieHimself – HonoreeSelf
Academy Event: Heat2016Video shortHimselfSelf
73rd Golden Globe Awards2016TV SpecialHimself – NomineeSelf
Behind the Scenes of Danny Collins2015Video shortHimselfSelf
Formula 1: BBC Sport2015TV SeriesHimselfSelf
Today2015TV SeriesHimself – GuestSelf
Fox and Friends2015TV SeriesHimselfSelf
Extra2014-2015TV SeriesHimself / Himself – The HumblingSelf
Third’s a Charm: The Making of ‘Ocean’s Thirteen’2014Video documentaryHimselfSelf
20th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards2014TV SpecialHimself – Nominated: Outstanding Male Actor in a Television Movie or MiniseriesSelf
The 65th Primetime Emmy Awards2013TV SpecialHimself – NomineeSelf
Inside Story: Scarface2013TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
The Lowdown on Making Stand Up Guys2013Video shortHimselfSelf
Stand Up Guys: American Muscle – The Stand Up Stunt Driving Scenes2013Video shortHimselfSelf
Stand Up Guys: The Stand Up Songs of Jon Bon Jovi2013Video shortHimselfSelf
Late Show with David Letterman2002-2013TV SeriesHimself – Guest / Himself – Top Ten List PresenterSelf
Close Up2012TV SeriesHimself – IntervieweeSelf
Night of Too Many Stars: America Comes Together for Autism Programs2012TV SpecialHimselfSelf
Casting By2012DocumentaryHimselfSelf
The Godfather Legacy2012TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
Little Spain2011DocumentaryHimselfSelf
Wilde Salomé2011DocumentaryHimself / King HerodSelf
The 65th Annual Tony Awards2011TV SpecialHimself – Nominated: Best Leading Actor in a PlaySelf
The Annual 2011 Actors Fund Gala Awards2011TV SpecialHimself – HonoreeSelf
17th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards2011TV SpecialHimselfSelf
The 68th Annual Golden Globe Awards2011TV SpecialHimself – WinnerSelf
The Being Frank Show2010TV SeriesHimselfSelf
The 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards2010TV SpecialHimself – Winner: Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a MovieSelf
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Mike Nichols2010TV MovieHimselfSelf
60 Minutes2010TV Series documentaryHimself – Interviewee (segment “Al Pacino”)Self
Entertainment Tonight2007-2010TV SeriesHimselfSelf
I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale2009Documentary shortHimselfSelf
Caia Quem Caia2008TV SeriesHimselfSelf
Film ’722008TV SeriesHimselfSelf
88 Minutes: Director’s Point of View2008Video shortHimselfSelf
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Warren Beatty2008TV SpecialHimselfSelf
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Al Pacino2007TV MovieHimselfSelf
Larry King Live2007TV SeriesHimself – GuestSelf
Jimmy Kimmel Live!2007TV SeriesHimself – Ocean’s 13 PremiereSelf
HBO First Look2007TV Series documentary shortHimselfSelf
Brando2007TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
Inside the Actors Studio2006TV SeriesHimself – GuestSelf
American Experience2006TV Series documentaryHimself / HickeySelf
‘Dog Day Afternoon’: After the Filming2006Video shortHimselfSelf
‘Dog Day Afternoon’: Casting the Controversy2006Video shortHimselfSelf
‘Dog Day Afternoon’: Recreating the Facts2006Video shortHimselfSelf
‘Dog Day Afternoon’: The Story2006Video shortHimselfSelf
Al Pacino: An American Cinematheque Tribute2006TV MovieHimselfSelf
The Making of ‘Two for the Money’2006Video documentary shortHimselfSelf
El Magacine1999-2005TV SeriesHimselfSelf
Corazón de…2005TV SeriesHimselfSelf
This Morning2005TV SeriesHimself – GuestSelf
The Making of ‘Heat’2005Video documentaryHimselfSelf
‘Merchant of Venice’: Shakespeare Through the Lens2005Video documentary shortHimselfSelf
The Oprah Winfrey Show2005TV SeriesHimself – GuestSelf
The 77th Annual Academy Awards2005TV SpecialHimself – Presenter: Honorary Oscar to Sidney LumetSelf
Pacino and DeNiro: The Conversation2005Video documentary shortHimselfSelf
The 62nd Annual Golden Globe Awards2005TV Special documentaryHimself – Presenter: Best Actress in Mini-Series or Made for TV MovieSelf
Babbleonia2005Video documentaryHimselfSelf
The Culture Show2004TV Series documentaryHimselfSelf
The 56th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards2004TV SpecialHimself – Winner: Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a MovieSelf
Caiga quien caiga2004TV SeriesHimselfSelf
10th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards2004TV SpecialHimself – Winner: Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Mini-Series or Made for TV MovieSelf
The 61st Annual Golden Globe Awards2004TV SpecialHimself – Winner: Best Actor in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for TelevisionSelf
Unseen + Untold: Scarface2003TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
Scarface: Acting2003Video documentary shortHimselfSelf
Scarface: Creating2003Video documentary shortHimselfSelf
Scarface: The Rebirth2003Video documentary shortHimselfSelf
The 100 Greatest Movie Stars2003TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
Cartaz Cultural2003TV SeriesHimselfSelf
180°: Christopher Nolan Interviews Al Pacino2002Video documentary shortHimselfSelf
Gala Paramount Pictures Celebrates 90th Anniversary with 90 Stars for 90 Years2002TV MovieHimselfSelf
Leute heute2002TV Series documentaryHimselfSelf
Exclusif2002TV SeriesHimselfSelf
America: A Tribute to Heroes2001TV Special documentaryHimselfSelf
The 58th Annual Golden Globe Awards2001TV SpecialHimself – HonoreeSelf
2000 Hispanic Heritage Awards2000TV SpecialSelf
The 54th Annual Tony Awards2000TV SpecialHimself – PresenterSelf
Making of the Insider2000TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
The Rosie O’Donnell Show1999TV SeriesHimself – GuestSelf
The Making of ‘Scarface’1998Video documentaryHimselfSelf
Mundo VIP1998TV SeriesHimselfSelf
À part ça…1998TV Series documentaryHimselfSelf
Pitch1997DocumentaryHimselfSelf
The 69th Annual Academy Awards1997TV SpecialHimself – Presenter: Best PictureSelf
Caiga quien caiga1996TV SeriesHimselfSelf
Primer plano1996TV SeriesHimselfSelf
Looking for Richard1996DocumentaryHimself / Richard IIISelf
Showbiz Today1995TV SeriesHimselfSelf
The 67th Annual Academy Awards1995TV SpecialHimself – Co-Presenter: Best PictureSelf
The 66th Annual Academy Awards1994TV SpecialHimself – Presenter: Best Actress in a Leading RoleSelf
Jonas in the Desert1994DocumentaryHimselfSelf
The 51st Annual Golden Globe Awards1994TV SpecialHimself – PresenterSelf
The Barbara Walters Summer Special1993TV SeriesHimself – GuestSelf
The 65th Annual Academy Awards1993TV SpecialHimself – Winner: Best Actor in a Leading Role & Nominated: Best Actor in a Supporting RoleSelf
Moving Image Salutes Al Pacino1993TV MovieHimself – HonoreeSelf
The 50th Annual Golden Globe Awards1993TV SpecialHimself – Winner: Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama & Nominated: Best Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion PictureSelf
The Making of ‘Scent of a Woman’1992Documentary shortLieutenant Colonel Frank SladeSelf
Madonna: Truth or Dare1991DocumentaryHimself (uncredited)Self
The 63rd Annual Academy Awards1991TV SpecialHimself – Nominated: Best Actor in a Supporting RoleSelf
The 48th Annual Golden Globe Awards1991TV SpecialHimself – Nominated: Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama & Best Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion PictureSelf
Tonight with Jonathan Ross1991TV SeriesHimselfSelf
The Godfather Family: A Look Inside1990TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
The Making of ‘Sea of Love’1989ShortHimselfSelf
Moving Image Salutes Elia Kazan1987TV MovieHimself – SpeakerSelf
Moving Image Salutes Sidney Lumet1985TV MovieHimself – SpeakerSelf
James Bond: The First 21 Years1983TV Movie documentaryHimselfSelf
Night of 100 Stars1982TV SpecialHimselfSelf
The 37th Annual Golden Globe Awards1980TV SpecialHimselfSelf
The 33rd Annual Tony Awards1979TV SpecialHimself – PresenterSelf
The 31st Annual Tony Awards1977TV SpecialHimself – WinnerSelf
Filming a Love Story: Bobby Deerfield1977Documentary shortHimselfSelf
Lumet: Film Maker1975Documentary shortHimselfSelf
The 28th Annual Tony Awards1974TV SpecialHimself – PresenterSelf
The 46th Annual Academy Awards1974TV SpecialHimself – Nominated: Best Actor in a Leading RoleSelf
The Godfather: Behind the Scenes1971Documentary shortHimselfSelf
The 23rd Annual Tony Awards1969TV SpecialHimself – WinnerSelf
The Being Frank Show2011-2012TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
Whistleblowers: The Untold Stories2011TV SeriesHimself – Award Winning ActorArchive Footage
60 Minutes2010TV Series documentaryHimself – Interviewee (segment “Al Pacino”)Archive Footage
Los mejores momentos de ‘Sé lo que hicisteis’2009VideoHimselfArchive Footage
Glenn Beck2009TV SeriesMichael CorleoneArchive Footage
MythBusters2008TV Series documentaryLieutenant Colonel Frank SladeArchive Footage
Return To..2008TV Series documentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Strictly Courtroom2008TV Movie documentaryArthur Kirkland / John Milton (uncredited)Archive Footage
Cámara negra. Teatro Victoria Eugenia2007TV Short documentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Premio Donostia a Matt Dillon2006TV SpecialHimselfArchive Footage
Premio Donostia a Max Von Sydow2006TV SpecialHimselfArchive Footage
Boffo! Tinseltown’s Bombs and Blockbusters2006DocumentaryMichael Corleone (uncredited)Archive Footage
The Godfather and the Mob2006TV Movie documentaryArchive Footage
Ban the Sadist Videos! Part 22006Video documentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Bullets Over Hollywood2005TV Movie documentaryArchive Footage
El oficio de actor2005TV Movie documentaryDon Michael Corleone
Sonny Wortzik
Archive Footage
Cinema mil2005TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
Premio Donostia a Willem Dafoe2005TV SpecialHimselfArchive Footage
Carlito’s Way: Brian De Palma on ‘Carlito’s Way’2005Video shortCarlitoArchive Footage
Midnight Movies: From the Margin to the Mainstream2005DocumentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Camilla: The Uncrowned Queen2005TV Movie documentaryHimself (uncredited)Archive Footage
Based on a True Story2004DocumentaryArchive Footage
Larry King Live2004TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
Corazón de…2004TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
Celebrities Uncensored2004TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
Sex at 24 Frames Per Second2003Video documentarySteve Burns (uncredited)Archive Footage
The Making of ‘Carlito’s Way’2003Video documentary shortCarlitoArchive Footage
Ultimate Fights from the Movies2002Video documentaryTony Montana (Scarface)Archive Footage
E! True Hollywood Story2002TV Series documentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Francis Coppola’s Notebook2001Video documentary shortArchive Footage
Gordon Willis on Cinematography2001Video documentary shortMichael Corleone (uncredited)Archive Footage
Biography2001TV Series documentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Hollywood Remembers2000TV Series documentaryArchive Footage
The 72nd Annual Academy Awards2000TV SpecialOfficer Frank Serpico (uncredited)Archive Footage
Tough Guise: Violence, Media & the Crisis in Masculinity1999Video documentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Gomorron1995TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
The Movie Show1995TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
100 Years at the Movies1994TV Short documentaryHimselfArchive Footage
In the Name of the Father1993Michael CorleoneArchive Footage
The Godfather Trilogy: 1901-19801992VideoDon Michael CorleoneArchive Footage
The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson1982TV SeriesIvan TravalianArchive Footage
America at the Movies1976DocumentaryHimselfArchive Footage
A Football Life2016TV SeriesHimselfArchive Footage
Quick Reviews with Maverick2016TV SeriesVincent Hanna / Ricky RomaArchive Footage
Welcome to the Basement2012-2015TV SeriesRicky Roma / Sonny / SerpicoArchive Footage
Charlie Rose2015TV SeriesHimself – GuestArchive Footage
Tellement Gay! Homosexualité et pop culture2015TV Mini-Series documentarySteve BurnsArchive Footage
Extra2014-2015TV SeriesHimself / Himself – The HumblingArchive Footage
2nd Indie Fest of YouTube Videos 20142014TV MovieHimselfArchive Footage
Ann-Margret: Från Valsjöbyn till Hollywood2014DocumentaryHimselfArchive Footage
Ann-Margret: Från Valsjöbyn till Hollywood (I)2014DocumentaryHimselfArchive Footage
America’s Book of Secrets2013TV Series documentaryTony MontanaArchive Footage
Edición Especial Coleccionista2013TV SeriesFrank SerpicoArchive Footage

Alfredo James Pacino Awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieCategory
2016EDA Special Mention AwardAlliance of Women Film JournalistsMost Egregious Age Difference Between the Leading Man and the Love InterestDanny Collins (2015)Won
2013Golden Camera for Lifetime AchievementGolden Camera, GermanyInternationalWon
2012Career Achievement AwardDublin International Film FestivalFor his outstanding contribution to filmWon
2012Razzie AwardRazzie AwardsWorst Screen CoupleJack and Jill (2011)Won
2012Razzie AwardRazzie AwardsWorst Supporting ActorJack and Jill (2011)Won
2011Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Won
2011ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or MiniseriesYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Won
2011Queer LionVenice Film FestivalWilde Salomé (2011)Won
2010Primetime EmmyPrimetime Emmy AwardsOutstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a MovieYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Won
2010Gold Derby TV AwardGold Derby AwardsTV Movie/Mini ActorYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Won
2010OFTA Television AwardOnline Film & Television AssociationBest Actor in a Motion Picture or MiniseriesYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Won
2010Satellite AwardSatellite AwardsBest Actor in a Miniseries or a Motion Picture Made for TelevisionYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Won
2009Gold Derby TV AwardGold Derby AwardsTV Movie/Mini Actor of the DecadeAngels in America (2003)Won
2009Yoga AwardYoga AwardsWorst Foreign ActorRighteous Kill (2008)Won
2007Life Achievement AwardAmerican Film Institute, USAWon
2005American Cinematheque AwardAmerican Cinematheque Gala TributeWon
2004Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Miniseries or a Motion Picture Made for TelevisionAngels in America (2003)Won
2004Primetime EmmyPrimetime Emmy AwardsOutstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a MovieAngels in America (2003)Won
2004Gold Derby TV AwardGold Derby AwardsTV Movie/Mini Lead ActorAngels in America (2003)Won
2004ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or MiniseriesAngels in America (2003)Won
2003OFTA Film Hall of FameOnline Film & Television AssociationActingWon
2001Cecil B. DeMille AwardGolden Globes, USAWon
2000Gala TributeFilm Society of Lincoln CenterWon
1997BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorDonnie Brasco (1997)Won
1997DGA AwardDirectors Guild of America, USAOutstanding Directorial Achievement in DocumentaryLooking for Richard (1996)Won
1996Lifetime Achievement AwardGotham AwardsWon
1996Donostia Lifetime Achievement AwardSan Sebastián International Film FestivalWon
1994Career Golden LionVenice Film FestivalWon
1993OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Actor in a Leading RoleScent of a Woman (1992)Won
1993Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – DramaScent of a Woman (1992)Won
1992Film Excellence AwardBoston Film FestivalWon
1992Best ActorValladolid International Film FestivalGlengarry Glen Ross (1992)Won
1991American Comedy AwardAmerican Comedy Awards, USAFunniest Supporting Actor in a Motion PictureDick Tracy (1990)Won
1980Best ActorKarlovy Vary International Film Festival…and justice for all. (1979)Won
1976BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Won
1976LAFCA AwardLos Angeles Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Won
1975KCFCC AwardKansas City Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Won
1975Prize San SebastiánSan Sebastián International Film FestivalBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Won
1974Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Actor in a Motion Picture – DramaSerpico (1973)Won
1974DavidDavid di Donatello AwardsBest Foreign Actor (Migliore Attore Straniero)Serpico (1973)Won
1973Special DavidDavid di Donatello AwardsThe Godfather (1972)Won
1973NBR AwardNational Board of Review, USABest ActorSerpico (1973)Won
1972NBR AwardNational Board of Review, USABest Supporting ActorThe Godfather (1972)Won
1972NSFC AwardNational Society of Film Critics Awards, USABest ActorThe Godfather (1972)Won
2016EDA Special Mention AwardAlliance of Women Film JournalistsMost Egregious Age Difference Between the Leading Man and the Love InterestDanny Collins (2015)Nominated
2013Golden Camera for Lifetime AchievementGolden Camera, GermanyInternationalNominated
2012Career Achievement AwardDublin International Film FestivalFor his outstanding contribution to filmNominated
2012Razzie AwardRazzie AwardsWorst Screen CoupleJack and Jill (2011)Nominated
2012Razzie AwardRazzie AwardsWorst Supporting ActorJack and Jill (2011)Nominated
2011Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Nominated
2011ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or MiniseriesYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Nominated
2011Queer LionVenice Film FestivalWilde Salomé (2011)Nominated
2010Primetime EmmyPrimetime Emmy AwardsOutstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a MovieYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Nominated
2010Gold Derby TV AwardGold Derby AwardsTV Movie/Mini ActorYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Nominated
2010OFTA Television AwardOnline Film & Television AssociationBest Actor in a Motion Picture or MiniseriesYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Nominated
2010Satellite AwardSatellite AwardsBest Actor in a Miniseries or a Motion Picture Made for TelevisionYou Don’t Know Jack (2010)Nominated
2009Gold Derby TV AwardGold Derby AwardsTV Movie/Mini Actor of the DecadeAngels in America (2003)Nominated
2009Yoga AwardYoga AwardsWorst Foreign ActorRighteous Kill (2008)Nominated
2007Life Achievement AwardAmerican Film Institute, USANominated
2005American Cinematheque AwardAmerican Cinematheque Gala TributeNominated
2004Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Miniseries or a Motion Picture Made for TelevisionAngels in America (2003)Nominated
2004Primetime EmmyPrimetime Emmy AwardsOutstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a MovieAngels in America (2003)Nominated
2004Gold Derby TV AwardGold Derby AwardsTV Movie/Mini Lead ActorAngels in America (2003)Nominated
2004ActorScreen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or MiniseriesAngels in America (2003)Nominated
2003OFTA Film Hall of FameOnline Film & Television AssociationActingNominated
2001Cecil B. DeMille AwardGolden Globes, USANominated
2000Gala TributeFilm Society of Lincoln CenterNominated
1997BSFC AwardBoston Society of Film Critics AwardsBest ActorDonnie Brasco (1997)Nominated
1997DGA AwardDirectors Guild of America, USAOutstanding Directorial Achievement in DocumentaryLooking for Richard (1996)Nominated
1996Lifetime Achievement AwardGotham AwardsNominated
1996Donostia Lifetime Achievement AwardSan Sebastián International Film FestivalNominated
1994Career Golden LionVenice Film FestivalNominated
1993OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Actor in a Leading RoleScent of a Woman (1992)Nominated
1993Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – DramaScent of a Woman (1992)Nominated
1992Film Excellence AwardBoston Film FestivalNominated
1992Best ActorValladolid International Film FestivalGlengarry Glen Ross (1992)Nominated
1991American Comedy AwardAmerican Comedy Awards, USAFunniest Supporting Actor in a Motion PictureDick Tracy (1990)Nominated
1980Best ActorKarlovy Vary International Film Festival…and justice for all. (1979)Nominated
1976BAFTA Film AwardBAFTA AwardsBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Nominated
1976LAFCA AwardLos Angeles Film Critics Association AwardsBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Nominated
1975KCFCC AwardKansas City Film Critics Circle AwardsBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Nominated
1975Prize San SebastiánSan Sebastián International Film FestivalBest ActorDog Day Afternoon (1975)Nominated
1974Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Actor in a Motion Picture – DramaSerpico (1973)Nominated
1974DavidDavid di Donatello AwardsBest Foreign Actor (Migliore Attore Straniero)Serpico (1973)Nominated
1973Special DavidDavid di Donatello AwardsThe Godfather (1972)Nominated
1973NBR AwardNational Board of Review, USABest ActorSerpico (1973)Nominated
1972NBR AwardNational Board of Review, USABest Supporting ActorThe Godfather (1972)Nominated
1972NSFC AwardNational Society of Film Critics Awards, USABest ActorThe Godfather (1972)Nominated